Posts tagged with "deposition"

Do I Have to Comply with Document Requests for A Deposition When the Opposing Side Has Not Complied?

You have an obligation to produce documents requested for deposition regardless of whether the opposing side has produced the documents or not.  If the opposing side has filed a motion for an extension of time then they might have been granted additional time to comply by the court.  You have the option to file for an extension of time, if you would like.  It would be helpful for you to consult with an experienced trial attorney in this matter to educate you on the rules of practice in Connecticut and the best way to proceed in this scenario.

If you have any questions regarding litigation in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

Do I Have to Comply with Document Requests for A Deposition When the Opposing Side Has Not Complied?

You have an obligation to produce documents requested for deposition regardless of whether the opposing side has produced the documents or not.  If the opposing side has filed a motion for an extension of time then they might have been granted additional time to comply by the court.  You have the option to file for an extension of time, if you would like.  It would be helpful for you to consult with an experienced trial attorney in this matter to educate you on the rules of practice in Connecticut and the best way to proceed in this scenario.

If you have any questions regarding litigation in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

What Is the Purpose of Interrogatories?

Interrogatories are part of the discovery process.  This process is an investigation conducted by the parties and their attorneys into the facts of the case.  Interrogatories are an important method to conduct this discovery, as they are responses to questions made under oath that may be used at trial.  If a question asked in an interrogatory has already been asked in a deposition, you may not file a motion to quash.  The rules of litigation may be complicated as they are governed by the Connecticut Practice Book.  If you have not already done so, you should consult a practicing attorney in Connecticut, who is familiar with these rules and can assist you during litigation. If you have any questions related to the discovery process in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.