Posts tagged with "fairfield county will"

What happens if I die without a will in Connecticut?

After someone dies, attention naturally shifts to the decedent’s survivors, property and wishes. A probate court (also called a surrogate court) is a specialized court that handles distribution of the decedent’s property and ensures that any debts, funeral expenses and taxes are paid prior to distributing the remaining assets. If there is a will, the decedent’s wishes are carried out and the process is typically straight forward. However, if there isno will, distribution of property is awarded to survivors in accordance with the state’slaws of “intestacy.”

In Connecticut, if you are survived by a spouse and children, your spouse takes the first $100,000 plus half of the remainder and your children take the other half of the remainder. If you are survived by a spouse and children who are not your spouse’s children, your spouse takes half and the children share the other half equally. If you are survived by a spouse and parent(s) but no children, your spouse takes the first $100,000 plus three quarters of the remainder and the parent(s) takes the other one quarter. If you are survived by a spouse only, your spouse takes it all. If you are survived by children only, your children take it all. If you are survived by parent(s) only, your parent(s) take it all. If you are survived by brother(s) and sister(s) only, your brother(s) and sister(s) take it all. If you are survived by next of kin only, your next of kin takes it all. If there is no next of kin but there is a step-child, your step-child takes it all. If there is no step-child, it all goes to the State of Connecticut.

Regardless of the value of your property, it is always in your best interest to have a will.If you have a will, it may be possible to reduce the amount of tax payable on the inheritance. If you die without a will, your money and property may not be distributed as you had wished. If you are unmarried but have a partner, he or she cannot inherit your property without a will. If you have children who are minors, you will need a will so that living and financial arrangements are as you had wished in the event of your death. If youor your former partner’s circumstances have changed and there is a new partner in the picture, you may want to have a will to ensure your property is distributed as you’d wished.

Maya Murphy Attorneys at Law can provide you with estate planning with artfully crafted trusts and tax avoidance. We know that clients want peace of mind for the future. Our experienced attorneys will help you map out a plan so that your family is properly cared for in the event of your death. Please call us at 203-221-3100, or email us at Ask@Mayalaw.com to schedule a free consultation.

Continue Reading

What happens if I die without a will in Connecticut?

After someone dies, attention naturally shifts to the decedent’s survivors, property and wishes. A probate court (also called a surrogate court) is a specialized court that handles distribution of the decedent’s property and ensures that any debts, funeral expenses and taxes are paid prior to distributing the remaining assets. If there is a will, the decedent’s wishes are carried out and the process is typically straight forward. However, if there isno will, distribution of property is awarded to survivors in accordance with the state’slaws of “intestacy.”

In Connecticut, if you are survived by a spouse and children, your spouse takes the first $100,000 plus half of the remainder and your children take the other half of the remainder. If you are survived by a spouse and children who are not your spouse’s children, your spouse takes half and the children share the other half equally. If you are survived by a spouse and parent(s) but no children, your spouse takes the first $100,000 plus three quarters of the remainder and the parent(s) takes the other one quarter. If you are survived by a spouse only, your spouse takes it all. If you are survived by children only, your children take it all. If you are survived by parent(s) only, your parent(s) take it all. If you are survived by brother(s) and sister(s) only, your brother(s) and sister(s) take it all. If you are survived by next of kin only, your next of kin takes it all. If there is no next of kin but there is a step-child, your step-child takes it all. If there is no step-child, it all goes to the State of Connecticut.

Regardless of the value of your property, it is always in your best interest to have a will.If you have a will, it may be possible to reduce the amount of tax payable on the inheritance. If you die without a will, your money and property may not be distributed as you had wished. If you are unmarried but have a partner, he or she cannot inherit your property without a will. If you have children who are minors, you will need a will so that living and financial arrangements are as you had wished in the event of your death. If youor your former partner’s circumstances have changed and there is a new partner in the picture, you may want to have a will to ensure your property is distributed as you’d wished.

Maya Murphy Attorneys at Law can provide you with estate planning with artfully crafted trusts and tax avoidance. We know that clients want peace of mind for the future. Our experienced attorneys will help you map out a plan so that your family is properly cared for in the event of your death. Please call us at 203-221-3100, or email us at Ask@Mayalaw.com to schedule a free consultation.

Continue Reading