Posts tagged with "illegal discrimination"

Is it Illegal for an Employer to Bully an Employee in Connecticut?

Anti-bullying laws currently do not apply to the workplace.  Accordingly, it is generally not a violation of workplace law if a coworker or supervisor engages in conduct hostile, overly critical, mean, unfair or even humiliating to the employee.  However, if the supervisor or coworker engages in such conduct because of the employee’s race, religion, gender, disability status, national origin, sexual orientation, age or other protected status, and the conduct complained of is sufficiently severe, then it may constitute illegal discrimination.

If you have any questions related to sexual harassment and discrimination in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

Is it Illegal for an Employer to Bully an Employee in Connecticut?

Anti-bullying laws currently do not apply to the workplace.  Accordingly, it is generally not a violation of workplace law if a coworker or supervisor engages in conduct hostile, overly critical, mean, unfair or even humiliating to the employee.  However, if the supervisor or coworker engages in such conduct because of the employee’s race, religion, gender, disability status, national origin, sexual orientation, age or other protected status, and the conduct complained of is sufficiently severe, then it may constitute illegal discrimination.

If you have any questions related to sexual harassment and discrimination in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

What is Sexual Harassment in Connecticut?

What is sexual harassment?

Sexual harassment is a form of illegal discrimination that comprises unwelcome sexual conduct affecting the terms and conditions of a person’s employment or that creates a hostile work environment. Examples of such conduct include: obscene communications such as emails or texts; the display or distribution of pornographic or otherwise offensive materials; unwanted or uninvited touching; sexual propositions with implied or explicit threats to your job security; and lewd comments or gestures. For sexual harassment to exist, the offending conduct must be sexual in nature or be based on hostility because of gender. The conduct also must be unwelcome, severe or pervasive, and affect the victim’s pay, benefits, work conditions or work environment.

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