Posts tagged with "layoff"

Q: Does my Employer Have to Give me Two Weeks Notice that I am Being Laid off?

Generally, your employer does not have an obligation to give you notice before a termination or layoff, or even to a change of control in the company.  However, there are many exceptions to this generalization.   For example, if you are a member of a union your contract probably requires a period of notice before a layoff.  Depending on the circumstances of your case, an exception may apply that may make you eligible for notice from your employer.  It would be best to consult an attorney with experience in employment law to review the facts of your case and your employment contract to determine definitively if notice was required.

If you have any questions related to employment law in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

Q: Does my Employer Have to Give me Two Weeks Notice that I am Being Laid off?

Generally, your employer does not have an obligation to give you notice before a termination or layoff, or even to a change of control in the company.  However, there are many exceptions to this generalization.   For example, if you are a member of a union your contract probably requires a period of notice before a layoff.  Depending on the circumstances of your case, an exception may apply that may make you eligible for notice from your employer.  It would be best to consult an attorney with experience in employment law to review the facts of your case and your employment contract to determine definitively if notice was required.

If you have any questions related to employment law in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

Is it Illegal to Decline to Hire a Qualified Candidate Because of Age in Connecticut?

Under both Connecticut and federal law, age discrimination against both employees and candidates for a job is illegal.  Under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (the “ADEA”), a federal statute, it is illegal to discriminate against anyone over 40 based on their age with respect to any term, condition, or privilege of employment, including hiring, firing, promotion, layoff, compensation or benefits, or job assignments, among other things.  It is also illegal to retaliate against anyone who opposes employment practices that discriminate based on age.

If you have any questions related to sexual harassment and discrimination in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.