Posts tagged with "order"

How Do I Get Child Support from Someone Who Is a Subcontractor?

Obtaining child support may be a complicated task if you do not know the name of the company employing the person you are seeking child support from.  If the court has not ordered support, you may go to court and obtain an order.  Once you have obtained a court order, if the subcontractor still has not paid support you may file a petition to show cause.  This will hold the subcontractor accountable to the court.

 

This may be overwhelming without the assistance of an attorney.  If you have any questions related to family law or obtaining child support in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

How Do I Get Child Support in Connecticut?

To receive monetary child support you must have a court order.  This court order establishes the need for monetary support as well as for health insurance and child care.  A court must approve all agreements for child support, even those that are voluntarily entered into by a non-custodial parent.  Support orders are calculated by the courts by using mandatory guidelines to ensure fair and consistent child support orders.  These guidelines are state regulations which consider the combined income of the mother and father and the number of children to set a reasonable child support amount.  The child support amount is subject to change, as it is based on income and the circumstances of each parent.

If you need to obtain a court order for child support, it would be in your best interest to consult with an experienced family law attorney to represent your case in court.  You may also apply for child support services that are offered by the state.  An experienced attorney will educate you on all of your options in this situation.

If you have any questions regarding family law in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

How Do I Get Child Support in Connecticut?

To receive monetary child support you must have a court order.  This court order establishes the need for monetary support as well as for health insurance and child care.  A court must approve all agreements for child support, even those that are voluntarily entered into by a non-custodial parent.  Support orders are calculated by the courts by using mandatory guidelines to ensure fair and consistent child support orders.  These guidelines are state regulations which consider the combined income of the mother and father and the number of children to set a reasonable child support amount.  The child support amount is subject to change, as it is based on income and the circumstances of each parent.

If you need to obtain a court order for child support, it would be in your best interest to consult with an experienced family law attorney to represent your case in court.  You may also apply for child support services that are offered by the state.  An experienced attorney will educate you on all of your options in this situation.

If you have any questions regarding family law in Connecticut, please contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq. at (203) 221-3100 or e-mail him directly at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

Connecticut Appellate Court reverses Judgment because Probate Court did not have authority to modify Final Order of Distribution of Estate

Connecticut Appellate Court reverses Judgment because Probate Court did not have authority to modify Final Order of Distribution of Estate

Silverstein v. Laschever, 113 Conn. App. 404, 970 A.2d 123 (2009)

 

The plaintiff, Morris Silverstein, appealed a Superior Court judgment upholding a Probate Court order confirming that mortgages be placed on land that is part of the Estate of Esther S. Silverstein (“Estate”).  The order also allowed fees to be charged to the Estate.  The plaintiff claimed that the order to place mortgages on the Estate property was improper and that the fees charged to the Estate were the administrator’s personal obligations.      

The Appellate Court found that the Probate Court’s previous order for property distribution made eleven years before the order allowing for the mortgaging of the property had terminated the Estate.  Therefore, the Probate Court did not have the authority to set aside, modify or revoke the previous order.  The previous order, affirmed on appeal, bound the parties pursuant to Connecticut General Statutes § 45a-24.  The Probate Court could not modify its previous order that distributed the proceeds of the Estate to the heirs. 

A supplemental accounting did not give the Probate Court the authority to issue additional orders after the previous order of distribution, a final order.  Likewise, the fact that the administrator did not comply with the distribution order and failed to distribute the property did not cause the property to remain part of the Estate.  Accordingly, an order to mortgage the property was not proper.  As a result, the Appellate Court reversed the judgment and the case was remanded with direction to render judgment to the plaintiff.    

Should you have any questions relating to estates or probate issues generally, please feel free to contact Russell J. Sweeting, Esq. in the firm’s Westport office in Fairfield County by telephone at (203) 221-3100 or by e-mail at rsweeting@mayalaw.com