To file for divorce in Connecticut, the person seeking the divorce (the “plaintiff”) files a document called a “complaint” in the superior court for the judicial district where at least one of the spouses lives. The complaint includes information about current living arrangements, the reason for the divorce, and any children of the marriage. In addition to asking that the marriage be terminated, the plaintiff can ask the court to divide marital property and debts, award alimony or child support, determine child custody, and restore a previous name.

When you file for divorce in Connecticut, automatic orders go into effect. Automatic orders are restraining orders that prevent either spouse from taking actions that would drastically affect the couple’s property or children without the other spouse’s consent, such as spending a large amount of money, changing life or medical insurance beneficiaries, mortgaging or selling a home, locking the other spouse out of the home, or taking children out of the state. The court can modify these orders in an appropriate case.

A Connecticut divorce typically takes at least four months. The court sets two dates when a complaint is filed. The first is the “return date,” which is at least four weeks away to give the defendant a chance to answer the complaint, file a cross complaint, or simply enter a “pro se” appearance. The second date is the “case management date,” which is at least 90 days after the return date and is the earliest date a divorce can be finalized. The court takes no action before the case management date so that the spouses have some time to settle issues out of court. Couples with children must also complete a court-approved parenting education program within 60 days of the return date.

This case was not handled by our firm. However, if you have any questions regarding this case, or any family matter, please contact Joseph Maya at 203-221-3100 or by email at JMaya@mayalaw.com.