Criminal Defense

Personal Injury Claim: Mother to Receive $7M for Child’s Injury

Mother to Receive $7 Million for Daughter’s Catastrophic Injuries

The parties in a personal injury case involving an unfortunate accident that caused traumatic brain injuries to an infant girl in New York have entered a settlement agreement just days before returning to the courtroom. Kenietra Grant is the plaintiff on behalf of her daughter, who was only two years old when her cranium was fractured in a 2008 motor vehicle accident. Ms. Grant will receive a settlement award in the amount of $7 million.

The Accident

The accident occurred on May 11, 2008. Ms. Grant and her daughter were traveling in a car driven by Sharnique Reynolds, who stopped the vehicle on the side of the road near the town of Tuxedo in Orange County, NY. According to counrt records from the Third Judicial Appellate Division, Ms. Reynolds decided to pull over after feeling overcome with drowsiness. Ms. Grants’ daughter was in the rear passenger seat when a car traveling at 65 mph struck Ms. Reynolds’ vehicle.

The driver of the striking vehicle, Estevan Nembhard, is a labor activist and organizer for Service Employees International Union. Mr. Nembhard was reportedly on his way back home from a meeting in Connecticut, where he met with future members of the labor union. The accident took place around 4:00 a.m. EST, and Ms. Grants’ daughter suffered traumatic brain injuries.

The Case

As the plaintiff on behalf of her daughter, Ms. Grant faced several challenges during her quest for relief. The case turned intricate with multiple defendants, various insurance companies, numerous motions and several cross claims. These are typical factors faced by catastrophic injury lawyers who represent the best interest of their clients in ruinous accidents such as the one suffered by Ms. Grants’ daughter.

Counsel for Mr. Nembhard’s employer has stated that the organizer was not performing the union’s work at the time of the accident. The union, however, has agreed to settle the case along with the insurers of the two vehicles involved in the collision.

By LaurenL, settlementboard.com

At Maya Murphy, P.C., our experienced team of personal injury attorneys is dedicated to achieving the best results for individuals and their families and loved ones whose daily lives have been disrupted by injury.  Our personal injury attorneys assist clients in New York, Bridgeport, Darien, Fairfield, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk, Stamford, Westport, and throughout Fairfield County. If you have any questions relating to a personal injury claim or an automobile accident claim or would like to schedule a free consultation, please contact our Westport office by phone at (203) 221-3100 or via e-mail at JMaya@Mayalaw.com to get in touch with our Managing Partner, Joseph Maya.

Wrongful Death Suit: Texting While Driving Fatality

The family of a Utah boy who was killed in an alleged texting-while-driving accident is suing the driver who hit him for wrongful death. The accused driver, Jeffery Lloyd Bascom, is also facing criminal charges under the state’s distracted driving law.

Thomas LaVelle Clark, 15, was walking along a semi-rural road on the outskirts of the town of Vernal when he was hit from behind by a pickup driven by Bascom, 28. Clark was thrown 40 feet over a ditch and landed near a cow pasture, according to local news reports.

Bascom admitted to police on the scene that he was texting at the time of the accident. Utah makes homicide involving the use of a hand-held wireless communication device while driving a second degree felony, which carries a prison term of up to 15 years.

The Clark accident is far from an isolated incident, unfortunately. According to the National Safety Council, there have already been nearly 100,000 vehicle crashes in the country this year involving cell phone use, or one every 24 seconds. And the National Highway Traffic Safety Association reports that around 3,000 people were killed in distracted driving accidents in 2010. The Association further notes that cell phone users are 23 times more likely to be involved in a crash.

States are legislating to catch up with technology, but laws on phone use while driving vary across the country. Ten states plus Washington, D.C., ban handheld phone use by drivers across the board. An additional 29 ban text messaging only.

A Strong Stance

Utah’s distracted driving law was updated last year to ban any cell phone use while driving, with the exception of making a call or using GPS. Violators can be charged with a misdemeanor, with heightened penalties if there is an injury involved. A felony, like in Bascom’s situation, comes into play when there is loss of life.

“Utah has taken a strong stance on this growing problem,” says Anthony C. McMullin of the McMullin Legal Group in St. George, Utah. “Utah’s 2012 amended texting law makes it much easier for prosecutors to successfully charge and convict violators.”

Plaintiffs could potentially bring a wrongful death or personal injury lawsuit regardless of the criminal laws surrounding an accident, but the existence of specific language for distracted driving can make it easier for attorneys to show a driver was at fault. “Utah’s newly amended texting law also has civil implications,” McMullin says. “The new law heightens the responsibility and duty of all drivers when they get behind the wheel. A driver’s duties include keeping one’s vehicle under control, maintaining a proper lookout and obeying the motor vehicle laws of the State of Utah.”

Texting drivers leave a trail of evidence behind them. Police can check a phone at the scene or, barring that, investigators or attorneys can subpoena phone records from the carrier to find out if a driver was sending any messages at the time of an accident, making it likely that they will be held accountable for their actions.

“If a person is texting or otherwise operating a cell phone while driving and that usage results in a motor vehicle accident, it is typically very easy to establish a breach of the driver’s duties,” says the attorney. “Bottom line is if a driver causes an accident while texting, they may not only be charged criminally but will almost certainly be civilly responsible for any injured parties damages.”

By: Aaron Kase, Laywers.com

At Maya Murphy, P.C., our experienced team of personal injury attorneys is dedicated to achieving the best results for individuals and their families and loved ones whose daily lives have been disrupted by injury.  Our personal injury attorneys assist clients in New York, Bridgeport, Darien, Fairfield, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk, Stamford, Westport, and throughout Fairfield County. If you have any questions relating to a personal injury claim or wrongful death suit or would like to schedule a free consultation, please contact our Westport office by phone at (203) 221-3100 or via e-mail at JMaya@Mayalaw.com to get in touch with our Managing Partner, Joseph Maya.

Toxicology Report Suppressed in DUI Case Because Warrantless Search Exceptions Did Not Apply

In this criminal law matter, a Superior Court of Connecticut granted a defendant’s motion to suppress evidence, because the State did not show exigent circumstances allowing the warrantless seizure.

This case arose from an incident that occurred on August 15, 2003. The defendant was involved in an automobile accident, resulting in the death of the other driver. He was transported to a nearby hospital where, without a warrant, police requested that his blood be drawn. One of the officers unaware of this order was informed of that the blood had been drawn, so he elected to not perform the field sobriety and chemical alcohol tests. Five days later, police applied for and was granted a warrant for the blood toxicology report. The defendant was charged with operating a motor vehicle while under the influence (OMVUI), in violation of Connecticut General Statutes (CGS) § 14-227a(a), and second-degree manslaughter with a motor vehicle, among several other counts. On March 8, 2004, the defendant submitted a motion to suppress the toxicology report, arguing that they were obtained in violation of the search and seizure protections of the state and federal constitutions.

Under state and federal law, individuals are protected against unreasonable searches and seizures of their persons, houses, papers, and effects. The “[c]ompulsory administration of a blood test” clearly constitutes a search and seizure of one’s person. If a search is conducted without a warrant evidencing probable cause, it is per se unreasonable, and evidence derived from this illegal search will be excluded unless one of a “few specifically established and well-delineated exceptions” applies. Two such exceptions to the exclusionary rule are inevitable discovery and exigent circumstances.

The inevitable discovery exception will thwart suppression of evidence if the State can show, by the preponderance of the evidence (more likely than not), that through lawful means the evidence would have been discovered anyway. Officers must have been actively pursuing such means before the constitutional violation in question occurred. In this case, the State argued that this exception applied because had the officer not been told the blood was drawn, he would have proceeded with the various OMVUI-related tests. Therefore, the State would have inevitably discovered the defendant’s blood alcohol content (BAC). However, the Superior Court was not persuaded, because the State assumed that the defendant would have consented to the alcohol chemical tests. Under CGS § 14-227b, a person is free to refuse the test, though he will face license suspension for doing so. As such, the police could not presume that this procedure would inevitably lead them to discovery of the defendant’s BAC level.

Exigent circumstances doctrine applies where police officers, who have requisite probable cause, do not have time to get a warrant. They must act swiftly to effectuate an arrest, search, or seizure, to avoid, for example, the destruction of evidence. The State bears the burden to point to specific and articulable facts that gave rise to the exigent circumstances. In this case, the State argued that if they did not order that the defendant’s blood be taken, they would have lost evidence of his BAC level. However, the Superior Court noted that the record was devoid of any facts to support this proposition. Therefore, because neither exception applied to the facts of this case, the Superior Court granted the defendant’s motion to suppress.

Written by Lindsay E. Raber, Esq.

When faced with a charge of operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated (a.k.a. driving under the influence) or license suspension, an individual is best served by consulting with an experienced criminal law practitioner. Should you have any questions regarding criminal defense, please do not hesitate to contact Attorney Joseph C. Maya in the firm’s Westport office in Fairfield County at 203-221-3100 or at JMaya@Mayalaw.com.

Joseph Maya selected to 2022 Edition of Best Lawyers in America

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Westport, CT

 

Maya Murphy, P.C. is pleased to announce that Joseph Maya has been included in the 2022 edition of The Best Lawyers in America®. Since it was first published in 1983, Best Lawyers has become universally regarded as the definitive guide to legal excellence.

Joseph Maya, a Connecticut and New York-based litigation attorney, was recognized in The Best Lawyers in America© 2022 edition. He has been rated Best Lawyers in America and ranks among the top private practice attorneys nationwide. Attorneys listed in this edition of The Best Lawyers in America were selected after an exhaustive peer-review survey that confidentially investigates the professional abilities and experience of each lawyer. Recognition in Best Lawyers® is widely regarded by both clients and legal professionals as a significant honor.

Mr. Maya has been practicing law in Connecticut for more than 25 years. He has been a licensed attorney in New York for more than 30 years.

“Best Lawyers was founded in 1981 with the purpose of highlighting the extraordinary accomplishments of those in the legal profession,” said Best Lawyers CEO Phillip Greer. “We are proud to continue to serve as the most reliable, unbiased source of legal referrals worldwide.”

Lawyers on The Best Lawyers in America list are divided by geographic region and practice areas. They are reviewed by their peers based on professional expertise, and undergo an authentication process to make sure they are in current practice and in good standing.

 

Maya Murphy, P.C. has offices in Westport, CT and New York City. For additional information on Joseph Maya or Maya Murphy, P.C., please visit its website at https://mayalaw.com, or call 203-221-3100.

 

Milford Teacher and Coach Accused of Assaulting Student

Via WFSB CT: MILFORD, CT

A Milford teacher is under arrest after being accused of placing a student in a headlock. Mark Ruzbarsky, a math teacher at Jonathan Law High School, was taken into custody July 3 on an arrest warrant. Police said Ruzbarsky, who is in his fourth year as a math teacher at Jonathan Law High School, was accused of restraining the unidentified student by the neck during a class at the school.

The incident reportedly happened during an algebra class in February, and Ruzbarsky was charged late last week. He said he didn’t mean to hurt the student and that it was all meant in fun. “I think that’s absolutely awful,” said Courtney Luciana of Milford. Milford police said Ruzbarsky was teaching the algebra class last February when he noticed a 15-year-old student wasn’t completing his classwork. That’s when investigators said he grabbed the student’s arm, and according to an arrest “Ruzbarsky then squeezed his neck and pushed his head down,” and the victim told police the headlock lasted about one second and that he could not breathe.

“It’s OK for teachers to play around with their students here and there but I don’t believe in putting their hands on a child whatsoever is OK,” said Luciana. Seconds after the alleged headlock, the victim told police that Ruzbarsky did it again and this time “he couldn’t breathe for approximately five seconds.” Ruzbarsky told police that it was all in good fun since “the victim raised his head and smiled at him.” Later that day, the student told a guidance counselor “his neck hurt when he touched it and he did have minor scrapes on his neck,” the warrant said.

William B. Westcott of Maya Murphy in Westport, Ruzbarsky’s lawyer, said his client had nothing to hide and released this statement:

“He placed his hands on a student’s shoulders during math class in an effort to do nothing more than engage the student’s attention. Mr. Ruzbarsky was attempting to be boisterous and brotherly in his approach. He was not angry with the student for any reason, nor was he meaning to discipline the student in any way. Mr. Ruzbarsky was both shocked and distraught when he learned only later in the day that he had made the student feel self-conscious and uncomfortable. It is important to note that Mr. Ruzbarsky was quickly returned to work after the school conducted its own investigation, even though the school was aware that this arrest would be forthcoming. It is apparent that the colleagues and administrators who personally know Mark Ruzbarsky are confident he poses no threat whatsoever to the students he supervises and educates.”

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Ruzbarsky, who is also the assistant wrestling coach at Jonathan Law High School, was charged with third-degree assault and second-degree breach of peace. The Milford school system would not comment on the case, but it did say that Ruzbarsky remained an employee.

Police said he is due in court July 29.

The original report on the incident can be found at the following link: http://www.wfsb.com/story/25955558/milford-teacher-arrested-for-assaulting-student

Pretrial Diversionary Programs in Connecticut

If you are a first-time offender in Connecticut, you may be eligible for pretrial diversionary programs, which consists of several programs designed to rehabilitate the offender, rather than punish them.  The objective, of course, is also to reduce recidivism and, effectively, state costs.  The public interest in minimizing repeat offenders is significant, which is why Connecticut continues to offer many offenders the benefit of these programs.    

Each diversionary program, while serving similar objectives, has different eligibility criteria, program objectives, time limitations, and requirements for successful completion.  Here is what you need to know about Connecticut’s most common diversionary programs:  

Accelerated Rehabilitation

To be eligible for Accelerated Rehabilitation (“AR”) in Connecticut, the defendant must be charged with a crime or, in some instances, a motor vehicle violation, not of serious nature.  The law expressly prohibits the use of AR for certain crimes including any class A or class B felony, operating under the influence, 2nd degree manslaughter, 2nd degree assault with a motor vehicle, 2nd degree sexual assault, 3rd degree sexual assault, 3rd degree sexual assault with a firearm, enticing a minor, 2nd or 3rd degree possession of child pornography, a crime or motor vehicle violation resulting in the death of another, family violence crimes, and others.  Prior convictions may also result in ineligibility for this program.  

If you are deemed eligible for this program, you will be supervised by the Court Support Services Division (“CSSD”).  While under CSSD supervision, the prosecution may be stayed for up to two (2) years enabling you time to successfully complete the program.    

Pretrial Alcohol Education Program

To be eligible for the Alcohol Education Program (“AEP”) in Connecticut, the defendant must be charged with operating under the influence, violating safe boating rules, or 2nd degree reckless vessel operation while under the influence, with some exceptions.  Like AR, prior convictions may also result in ineligibility for this program.  

If you are deemed eligible, you will be allocated one (1) year to complete this program consisting of between ten (10) to fifteen (15) sessions of an alcohol intervention or substance abuse program.  

Pretrial Drug Education and Community Service

To be eligible for the Drug Education and Community Service program, the defendant must be charged with a drug paraphernalia or possession crime or possession of less than .5 ounce of marijuana punishable by fine.  

Under this program, the defendant must submit to a Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (“DMHAS”) for evaluation.  The defendant is allocated one (1) year to complete this program consisting of a fifteen (15) session drug education or substance abuse treatment program.  

Pretrial Family Violence Education Program

To be eligible for the Family Violence Education Program (“FVEP”) in Connecticut, the defendant must be charged with a family violence crime, with some exceptions.  A family violence crime, in Connecticut, is defined as a crime that includes an element of family violence to a family or household member.  The law expressly prohibits the use of FVEP for class A, B, C, or unclassified felonies with possible prison sentences greater than ten (10) years, and class D or unclassified felonies with possible prison sentences greater than five (5) years.  Any offenders that were involved in a family violence crime that involved inflicting serious physical injury are also ineligible without good cause.  Prior family violence convictions may also result in ineligibility for this program. 

If you are deemed eligible for this program, the Court Support Services Division (“CSSD”) will supervise you to ensure successful completion.  While under CSSD supervision, the prosecution may be stayed for up to two (2) years.

Pretrial Supervised Diversionary Program

To be eligible for the Pretrial Supervised Diversionary Program in Connecticut, the defendant must be charged with a crime or motor vehicle violation that is not of serious nature and must have a mental or emotional condition that has substantial adverse effects on the defendant’s ability to function.  This condition must require care and treatment.  Alternatively, the defendant may be eligible if they are a veteran with a mental health condition that is amenable to treatment if not dishonorably discharged from the military.  

If deemed eligible for this program, CSSD will develop a tailored treatment plan, even collaborating with state and federal agencies including DMHAS and the state and federal veteran’s departments.  Unlike the other diversionary programs, specially trained probation officers will supervise the defendant ensuring successful completion.  

With all of these programs, eligibility and admission into the program will not always result in your charges being dismissed.  It is imperative that you are wholly compliant with the court’s directives to ensure successful completion.  

If you have any further questions about criminal diversionary programs in Connecticut or would like the representation of an experienced attorney to assist you, contact our Managing Partner Joseph Maya directly via email at JMaya@Mayalaw.com or by telephone at (203) 221-3100 for a free consultation.

Operating Under the Influence in Connecticut

If you are facing allegations of Operating Under the Influence (“OUI”) under Connecticut Law, you must understand the charges you are facing.  These offenses are taken seriously and can result in significant penalties including community service, probation, fines, license restrictions, and even jail time – depending on the facts and circumstances of your case.  The actions you take, or fail to take, before, during, and after you are charged can alter the outcome of the case significantly.

In the event that this is not your first-time facing allegations of Operating Under the Influence in Connecticut, the consequences become significantly more serious.  Here is what you need to know about OUI penalties in Connecticut:

1st Offense

Under Connecticut law, any person who violates the operating under the influence statute for the first time will be charged with a class B misdemeanor.  While this may sound relatively insignificant to you, the statute imposes additional penalties including a mandatory minimum of forty-eight (48) hours in jail and a fine of between five hundred and one thousand ($500-$1000) dollars.  If you are facing charges in addition to the OUI charge, expect even more consequences.  

2nd Offense

Any person who violates the operating under the influence statute for the second time in Connecticut will face even more serious consequences.  Under the statute, an OUI conviction as a second offender will result in a felony, rather than the misdemeanor charge given to first-time offenders.  The statute additionally imposes a much more severe mandatory minimum of one hundred twenty (120) days in jail and a fine somewhere between one and four ($1,000-$4,000) dollars.  Again, additional charges may result in even more penalties.

3rd Offense 

By the time you are charged with your third OUI in Connecticut, the law is not on your side and you can expect serious consequences.  If your choices have led to yet another OUI arrest, under Connecticut law you will be charged with an even more serious class E felony.  A conviction of a Class E felonies can mean up to three (3) years in prison.  The statute additionally requires a mandatory minimum of one (1) year in jail and a fine somewhere between two and five thousand ($2,000-$5,000) dollars.

On top of the already serious consequences, additional penalties may include community service, the requirement to complete a criminal diversionary program including the Alcohol Education Program, probation, conditional discharge outlining the terms of your release from custody, points on your license, the installation of an ignition interlock device on your vehicle requiring you to submit to a breath test every time you operate your vehicle, other license restrictions, and license suspension.   With so much at stake, it is imperative that you seek the assistance of competent counsel. An experienced OUI attorney can assist you in negotiating the best possible outcome for your case.

 

If you have any further questions about Operating Under the Influence in Connecticut or would like the representation of an experienced attorney to assist you, contact our Managing Partner Joseph Maya directly via email at JMaya@Mayalaw.com or by telephone at (203) 221-3100 for a free consultation.

 

What You Need to Know About Expungement in Connecticut

Is Your Criminal Record Haunting You Years Later?  What You Need to Know About Expungement in Connecticut…

If you live in Connecticut, the Connecticut Board of Pardons and Paroles (“BOPP”) Pardon Division has the power to grant a criminal expungement, also known as an Absolute Pardon.  Alternatively, for those not yet eligible for an absolute pardon, the BOPP has the power to issue a Certificate of Employability (“COE”) which can help you to secure employment while you get back on your feet.  

Absolute Pardon

An Absolute Pardon is an absolute erasure of your Connecticut criminal record.  To be eligible, certain requirements must be met:

  1. You must be a resident of the state of Connecticut.
  2. You must have one (1) or more criminal conviction(s) in any state of jurisdiction.
  3. Three (3) years must have passed since your most recent misdemeanor conviction.
  4. Five (5) years must have passed since your most recent felony conviction.
  5. Thirteen (13) months must have passed since the court nolled any charges against you.  
  6. You must have no pending charges, open cases, or be on any form of supervision in any jurisdiction, state of federal.

Assuming you have met all of these eligibility requirements, you may apply for an absolute pardon.  Once the application is started, you or your attorney will have six (6) months to complete the process, and it can be quite involved.  An Absolute Pardon in Connecticut requires a comprehensive background check that includes gathering imperative documents including your driver’s license, a criminal history report; fingerprints; incident reports; and court, probation, and police records.  In addition to these documents, you are required to submit at least three (3) character reference questionnaires.   Once your file has been complete, a pre-screen telephone interview will be scheduled and finally, you will be required to attend a hearing on the issue.

We get it – it sounds involved.  There is good news if your offenses are considered “non-violent” and do not involved a listed victim.  Non-violent offenders may be considered for expedited review, and it is possible for your expungement to be processed without the need for a pre-screen telephone interview or hearing.  However, this process is discretionary with the Pardons Board so do not hang your hat on it.

Like just about every other area of law, every case is different.  It is impossible to determine whether or not you will or will not succeed in the process, though some factors may help (or hurt) you.  The BOPP will look at a variety of factors, including but not limited to, the severity of the offense, the extent of your criminal record, how long it has been since your last conviction, whether the crime had any impact on the community, whether there were any listed victims and what input they might have had, and what you have been doing since the conviction are just some considerations that will go into assessing the application.  Have you been very active in your community?  Have you completely turned your life around?  Have you been able to hold steady employment?  The list can go on.

Certificate of Employability

Even if you are not eligible for an Absolute Pardon at this time, the BOPP offers an alternative; a Certificate of Employability.  A COE is also known as a Provisional Pardon or Certificate of Rehabilitation.  Unlike an Absolute Parson, the process of obtaining this certificate does not erase your criminal record.  A COE is intended for employment and licensure purposes only.  

To be eligible for a COE, certain requirements must be met:

  1. You must be a resident of the state of Connecticut.
  2. You must have one (1) or more criminal conviction(s) in any state of jurisdiction.
  3. If you have recently completed a sentence or are on parole or special parole:
    1. You must have been in the community for ninety (90) days and have no new arrest(s) if you have recently completed your sentence and are not currently under supervision.
    2. You must have completed ninety (90) days of supervision if you are under the supervision of the Department of Corrections Parole and Community Services Division.
  4. Thirteen (13) months must have passed since the court nolled any charges against you.  

If you are currently on probation and have more than ninety (90) days of supervision left, you must apply through the Court Support Services Division (“CSSD”).  Contact your probation officer for further information.

Assuming you have met all of these eligibility requirements, you may apply for a COE.  The BOPP requires you to submit a Background Investigation Authorization Form, a copy of your valid Driver’s License or State ID, and a Supervising Officer Questionnaire for those currently under any form of supervision.  

Like Absolute Pardon applications, once submitted, your application for a COE will be reviewed and investigated.  Once the investigation and administrative review are complete, the Board will either deny or grant the issuance of the Certificate.  Unlike an Absolute Pardon, a hearing is not necessary for your application for a COE.    

If you have any further questions about expungement in Connecticut, contact our Managing Partner Joseph Maya directly via email at JMaya@Mayalaw.com or by telephone at (203) 221-3100 for a free consultation.

What is an Assault in Connecticut?

An assault is often the result of a fight where one person hits another and the cops are called. In Connecticut, there are various degrees of assault that come with varying forms of punishment. The degree of assault and the appropriate punishment depend on the harm caused, who the harm was cause to, the intent behind the assault, and if any weapons were used in the assault.

To begin, assault in the first degree is the most serious, as well as the most penalized degree. This degree of assault is a Class B felony, has a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, a minimum sentence of 5 years in prison, and could carry up to $15,000 in fines alongside the jail time. So what is a first degree assault in Connecticut? Well, an assault is considered first degree if it involves:

  • causing serious injury with a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument, or
  • intending to seriously or permanently disfigure a person, or to destroy, amputate, or disfigure a persons body, or
  • recklessly engaging in behavior that could cause a person’s death, that results in serious physical injury to another person, or
  • intent to cause serious physical injury with 2 or more other people participating.

Next, assault in the second degree is a Class D felony, can come with up to $5000 in fines, and carries a minimum prison sentence of 1 year with a maximum sentence of 5. Additionally, if the assault was in a motor vehicle, a 1 year license suspension could also be a penalty. A second degree assault is committed if it involves:

  • causing serious injury,
  • intent to cause serious injury with a deadly weapon (other than a firearm),
  • recklessly causing serious injury with a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument, or
  • intentionally administering a drug or controlled substance without that persons consent.

Finally, assault in the third degree is a Class A misdemeanor, carries up to 1 year in prison and up to $2000 in fines. An assault is defined as third degree if it involves:

  • intentionally causing physical injury,
  • recklessly causing serious physical injury, or
  • with criminal negligence, causing physical serious injury with a deadly weapon.

Additionally, if any of these degrees of assault are commit on a pregnant woman, a blind person, or a Department of Corrections Employee or prison official, the sentences may be enhanced and penalties increased.

If you or someone you know has been charged with assault and needs appropriate defense, or if you or someone you know has been assaulted and needs stellar representation, Maya Murphy is here to help. At Maya Murphy, PC in Westport, CT we have been aiding the citizens of Fairfield County for over a decade in criminal cases. With an impressive court record and a team with years of experience, our attorneys are sure to meet your needs. Call today at 203-222-MAYA or email us at Ask@mayalaw.com

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Maya Murphy is a law firm located in Westport, CT that also has offices in New York City. The Connecticut office has served the residents of Darien, Westport, Norwalk, Stamford, Trumbull, Weston, and other Fairfield County towns for over a decade. Put experience on your side, call today.

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What is an Assault in Connecticut?

An assault is often the result of a fight where one person hits another and the cops are called. In Connecticut, there are various degrees of assault that come with varying forms of punishment. The degree of assault and the appropriate punishment depend on the harm caused, who the harm was cause to, the intent behind the assault, and if any weapons were used in the assault.

To begin, assault in the first degree is the most serious, as well as the most penalized degree. This degree of assault is a Class B felony, has a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, a minimum sentence of 5 years in prison, and could carry up to $15,000 in fines alongside the jail time. So what is a first degree assault in Connecticut? Well, an assault is considered first degree if it involves:

  • causing serious injury with a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument, or
  • intending to seriously or permanently disfigure a person, or to destroy, amputate, or disfigure a persons body, or
  • recklessly engaging in behavior that could cause a person’s death, that results in serious physical injury to another person, or
  • intent to cause serious physical injury with 2 or more other people participating.

Next, assault in the second degree is a Class D felony, can come with up to $5000 in fines, and carries a minimum prison sentence of 1 year with a maximum sentence of 5. Additionally, if the assault was in a motor vehicle, a 1 year license suspension could also be a penalty. A second degree assault is committed if it involves:

  • causing serious injury,
  • intent to cause serious injury with a deadly weapon (other than a firearm),
  • recklessly causing serious injury with a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument, or
  • intentionally administering a drug or controlled substance without that persons consent.

Finally, assault in the third degree is a Class A misdemeanor, carries up to 1 year in prison and up to $2000 in fines. An assault is defined as third degree if it involves:

  • intentionally causing physical injury,
  • recklessly causing serious physical injury, or
  • with criminal negligence, causing physical serious injury with a deadly weapon.

Additionally, if any of these degrees of assault are commit on a pregnant woman, a blind person, or a Department of Corrections Employee or prison official, the sentences may be enhanced and penalties increased.

If you or someone you know has been charged with assault and needs appropriate defense, or if you or someone you know has been assaulted and needs stellar representation, Maya Murphy is here to help. At Maya Murphy, PC in Westport, CT we have been aiding the citizens of Fairfield County for over a decade in criminal cases. With an impressive court record and a team with years of experience, our attorneys are sure to meet your needs. Call today at 203-222-MAYA or email us at Ask@mayalaw.com

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Maya Murphy is a law firm located in Westport, CT that also has offices in New York City. The Connecticut office has served the residents of Darien, Westport, Norwalk, Stamford, Trumbull, Weston, and other Fairfield County towns for over a decade. Put experience on your side, call today.

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